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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 276-283

Risk factors and co-morbid anxiety and depression in pregnancy in a Tertiary Hospital In Southeast Nigeria


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria
3 Department of Pathology, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
M S Ezeme
FMCPsych, Department of Internal Medicine, Enugu State University of Science and Technology, Enugu
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4314/jcm.v23i2.4

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Background: Anxiety and depression commonly co-exist, and as a consequence entails greater suffering, low quality of life and poor foetal outcome. Not many studies have determined the rate of co-occurrence of anxiety/depression, and the associated risk factors in pregnancy. Methods: It was a cross sectional study of 200 consecutive attendees of antenatal clinic of a tertiary hospital using Sociodemographic, Obstetric questionnaires, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Index of Marital Satisfaction, Big Five Personality Inventory, Brief Coping Scale and Oslo-3 Social Support Scale. Data collected were analyzed with Chi-square and Pearson's correlation and multiple regression tests. Results: Thirty-five (17.5%) out of two hundred participants had anxiety, 21/200 (10.5%) were depressed, while 9/200 (4.5%) were both depressed and anxious. Poor social support was predictive for depression (P=0.03, CI=-.43 to -.02). Poor marital satisfaction (P< 0.001, CI=.04 to .10), neuroticism personality trait (P< 001, CI=.08 to .28) were predictive for both depression and anxiety. Use of problem-based and emotion-based coping skills, positively correlated with having anxiety symptoms (r=0.150, P=0.03; r=0.159, P=0.02 respectively). No association was found between anxiety/depression and parity, unemployment, gestational age, past obstetrics and gynaecology history. Conclusion: Clinicians should evaluate patients further when anxiety or depression is detected in pregnancy. The importance of good interpersonal relationship in the family, extended family and next-door neighbours should be emphasised.


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